My Communal Table


Beet Samosas with Mint Sauce
November 2, 2010, 11:14 am
Filed under: Appetizers, sauces and condiments | Tags: , , , ,

Beets! Yes, you read it correctly. They have to be the most beautiful of the root vegetables and I just adore them. These samosas have a nice flaky crisp when you bite into them. The beets are so naturally sweet that is almost could be served as a dessert. Then you put some mint sauce with it and you have fresh taste with a big kick. Being a member of the spinach family its loaded with tons of nutrients, fiber and low in calories and fat. Without even trying, I made a wonderful vegan dish. It is always good to have a few of those up your selves.

I had my youngest son’s two best buddies and their families over for Sunday dinner and I served these. The samosas were a hit with the kids because they were sweet and then with the addition of the mint sauce… it makes it far more sophisticated for the adults. One of keys to successful entertaining is to have your most of your meal prepared ahead of time. These take a little time to prepare, but hold wonderfully while you are pulling together your meal.

We gobbled down the leftover samosas the next morning with lots of strong tea and it was a fabulous breakfast.

Makes 12

Beet Samosas:

2 beets, medium size
3 cloves garlic
3-5 tablespoons olive oil
salt & pepper, to taste
8 sheets of filo
1 tablespoon ginger, freshly grated
1 lime, juice of

1. Peel beets and quarter them, placing in foil.

2. Add garlic, salt & pepper, then cover beets with oil. Secure foil around beets.

3. Cook in foil at 400F for about 40 minutes. Make sure the beets are tender.

4. When beets cool, grate them and place in a bowl.

5. Add soft garlic from foil, grated ginger, and lime juice. Then salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.

6. Place 1 filo sheet on work surface, brush with olive oil, place next filo sheet on top, brush with olive oil, repeat for a total of 4 sheets of filo.

7. Cut filo into 6 equal strips along the width.

8. Place a heaping tablespoon of beet mixture on one end of strip and fold like a flag, forming a triangle. Place on baking sheet.
Repeat with the next four sheets of filo.

9. Bake at 350F for about 20-25 minutes until golden brown and flaky. Serve with mint sauce.

Mint Sauce:

1/2 cup mint, fresh
1/4 cup cilantro, fresh
1 jalapeno, deseeded & deveined
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
1 1/2 tablespoon white onion
1 1/2 tablespoon Water
1 teaspoon sesame oil
salt & pepper, to taste

1. Add mint through water in food processor and blend until finely chopped. Put in bowl.

2. Add sesame oil, salt and pepper. Serve with beet samosas.

This dish is inexpensive to make, but packs a bunch in presentation and flavor. It is a little labor intensive on the beginning end, but super easy to make in advance. I love how everyone was so appreciative of the effort I made for the meal. Everyone felt so taken care of. Now that is what makes entertaining fun for me.

Pull up a chair, Elizabeth



Gramma Schuler’s Pasties

My family has deep roots in Northern Michigan and its rich mining tradition. The Pasty was a traditional savory meat pie that was cooked in the morning, wrapped up and placed in a tin, so that lunch would be warm for the miners. Initials that were placed in the pies crust were to tell the difference among the different mens pasties and the thick crust edges were so the miners dirty hands had a place to grab without getting their lunch covered with soot.

I have always had it served with ketchup, but in Quebec they serve it covered with brown gravy.The blend of beef and pork with sweetness of the rutabega really make this perfect rich fall dish. This is my kind of comfort food.

I often make it in classic pie form with two crusts.Today I made it in traditional form, but I have made them the size of a twinkie as well. The possibilities are endless. It is great to take for a potluck or tailgating. I usually serve a green salad with a tart vinaigrette to compliment this savory meat pie.

My mother remembers her gramma cutting a large amount of lard into flour and placing it into a huge crockery that went in the cellar. My grandmother would walk to the cellar in the morning to gather all the things that need to cook that day and would take a bowl with her. She knew exactly how many handfuls of the lard filled flour she need for what she was making that day. In the end, there seems to nothing flakier then a lard crust and my son is allergic to dairy, so lard it is.

Serves 4
Gramma Schuler’s Pasties:

1/2 pound small diced sirloin
1/2 pound small diced pork steak
1 cup russet potato, peeled and small diced
1 cup rutabega, peeled and small diced
1 cup onion, finely diced
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, finely chopped
1 tablespoon flour
2 tablespoons butter
salt and pepper, to taste, be generous

1.Preheat oven to 400F.

2. Prepare Gramma’s Pie Crust in the quality you desire. Cover and let rest.

*Note: see crust recipe to see the correct quantity. Depending if you make your pasty in individual pies or in traditional pie form.

3. Mix all the ingredients in mixing bowl.

4. Roll out crust. Fill with meat mixture. Dab mixture with butter. Fold over top crust. Vent.

5. Bake for 30-40 minutes or until golden brown.

Gramma’s Pie Crust:

1/3 cup lard
1 tablespoon butter
1 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 cup ice cold water

1. These ingredients make one nine-inch pie shell. If you are making a traditional pie, double the ingredients. If you are making four individual pies, triple the ingredients.

2. Sift the flour and salt together in a large bowl. Cut the lard and butter into the flour using a fork or cutter until the fat pieces are the size of peas.

3. Add water gradually, gently mixing with your hands until dough hold together. Do not overmix or the crust will be tough. Cover the dough with plastic wrap and chill before using.

Some of my earliest memories are how much I loved my grandmothers. My Gramma Schuler just shined. She loved her friends and was a fabulous cook. I just remember how much I felt loved by her. Here is to all the food memories that remind us of beautiful moments in our life. Here is to the food memories that teach us how our ancestors lived and let us know just a little more about ourselves.

Pull up a chair, Elizabeth